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What WoW, FFXIV and Guild Wars 2 can learn from each other

Since they debuted, I’ve been playing World of Warcraft, Final Fantasy XIV (ARR), and Guild Wars 2. Over the years, I have fluctuated between each one, with my playtime and waning between all of them. I’ve also taken multiple breaks for a variety of reasons, but they all provide something unique that keeps me coming back for a long time. While I don’t want any of these games to integrate all aspects of the others, there are a few things I wish would intertwine between the games. This will be a three-part column where I discuss what each of these games excels at and how I wish it would learn from the other two. First is World of Warcraft!

The best parts of WoW

In addition to the friendship that I had OH Over the years, the main thing that keeps me coming back is raiding. I like to hang out with friends and work together to defeat bosses. Many people focus on the Mythic raid as if it were the only thing that matters, but I’m happy to focus on the Hero raid. It provides plenty of challenge without affecting me too much outside of game time. I know I could hit Mythic if I wanted to, but doing advanced content would require me to play in a very different way from what’s exciting for me.

One of the best aspects of Heroic Strike is the flexible raid size system. We can raid as long as we have more than 10 people ready. This gives the players in our game more freedom to take care of things in real life without feeling like they’re letting the guild down. It also didn’t force us to sit everyone on the sidelines because we had too many people wanting to raid. Of course, there are always stops in raids where a certain number of raiders can make the fight easier or more difficult, so it’s not a perfect system. We also had to make sure we had enough healing for the number of raiders we had on a given night, but overall it’s a well-functioning system.

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Besides, OH removed Patchwork combat styles, where the player only needed to kill one, with minimal mechanics. This is a good transition because any trained monkey can stand there and press its buttons in the specified order when they don’t have to do anything else. In both Castle Nathria and the Sanctum of Domination, they moved towards the boss with a combination of different mechanics that provided their own challenges. For example, the Blood Council fight in Nathria was a welcome change of pace, where we would engage in a “dance” during the intermission. It’s not too challenging or anything, but it’s nice to do something different.

I also really like how some battles like Guardian in Sanctum focus on tank mechanics while others like Soulrender are generally more mechanical testing. It allows my focus to be used in a variety of ways, which is useful when raiding for hours. I used to think that the ideal difficulty curve for ambushes was that each boss gets progressively harder until you get to the end, but I’m not sure that’s really the best way. It’s great that we have a tough, highly focused boss, followed by a slightly easier boss. It helps things flow a bit more and reduces the feeling of getting stuck in the meat grinder the more you push in. However, in recent raids, the difficulty curve between bosses has been hit or missed a bit.

Guild Wars 2

I also wanted to take the experience to the next level as one of the best because I appreciate what they did. Giving players a way to enjoy the full extent of the expansion’s valuable content while leveling up and having everything on par with you is a great concept. However, the fact that this wasn’t balanced with patch content really thwarted the whole idea of ​​giving players a cohesive story while leveling up. This is also compounded by the fact that part of that story is told in raids, and doing old raids while leveling is not an option for the most part. . I hope they continue to work on it, because the foundation that has been laid is very good.

What WoW Can Learn From FFXIV & GW2

If there is one thing from FFXIV I can bring OH, it will be the daily Roulette system. Past dungeons, trials, and raids are all available to anyone lined up to this system. Players get experience rewards once a day, gil and sometimes whatever end-game tokens are available to join. It’s a great way to upgrade alternative jobs and earn some extra currency. It also helps players who want to do these types of content for the first time as they can line up for the specific dungeons, trials or raids they want and be matched with daily roulette players. their. If you exceed the level for the asset, your level will be reduced to the level appropriate for the given task.

FFXIV Duty List

However, the level of distortion has a bit of a downside. The way it is done in FFXIV, when you get squashed you also lose abilities that you couldn’t have on the level you are being squashed. This can often make some work feel weird to play with. This is especially true for jobs that start at a higher level. For example, Samurai starts at level 60, so when I’m squashed at level 15 I often feel like I can’t do anything because Samurai wasn’t designed to work with so little skill. Even so, though, things work pretty well and most missions complete quickly, and it’s a good experience for new and old players alike.

In OH, this could work similarly and give players a way to level up without playing through the storyline if they wanted to. Bringing all the dungeons and raids back to the table as relevant content will also help keep variety high and allow veteran players to visit old content in a slightly more satisfying way compared to just soloing old raids at max level. Walking through time is a small measure in relation to this, and it would be interesting if it could, it would be nice if the old content would always be available that way for anyone who wants to participate.

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When it comes Guild Wars 2, I wish OH will look at them and learn not to build systems for just one expansion and instead provide us with interesting things we can move forward through future expansions. Some systems GW2 introduced in the expansions are mounts (they work differently than any other MMO and are more than just a faster way to get from point A to point B), slide and bounce. After these systems were introduced, ArenaNet did a great job of creating new content and thinking about how best to incorporate them into new maps and regions.

Also, they never take away these systems when we have them. There may be areas where mounts and surf can be restricted for various reasons, but we never need to earn them again once unlocked. I know OH will probably never let us fly in the first place in an expansion, but it would be nice to be able to implement some extended features later into other expansions. For example, I still want to have some things to do in the Classroom in the meantime BfA. I know there’s been a war between factions, possibly totality, but it doesn’t feel insurmountable.

I’m not saying every system needs to evolve and be used continuously; I’m happy to let the azurite gear burn in the trash. However, building systems that pay attention to how they can be used now and how they can be useful in the future will make OH feels like a more solid game overall. Sure, some things won’t work out, but keeping and taking advantage of things that are widely available will be a better experience overall. As such, every feature expansion is a bit pointless to some extent because I know they’ll all be up for debate as soon as the next expansion comes out, and it doesn’t have to be.

Those are my thoughts on OH and what I’d like to see it learn from other MMOs. Is there anything you’d like to see it draw from other games? Anything from games other than FFXIV and GW2?

https://www.mmorpg.com/columns/what-wow-ffxiv-and-guild-wars-2-can-learn-from-each-other-2000123809 What WoW, FFXIV and Guild Wars 2 can learn from each other

Hung

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