Terrorists Are Using Porn Anime Against Facebook’s Virtual Battles

BILLIONhe Facebook The “Soldiers of the Righteous Caliphate” group is a seething cauldron of toxic extremist support drawn from rival groups including Islamic State, and Taliban. It is filled with images of beheadings, military exercises, and hand-painted faceless portraits of The late leader of ISIS Abu Bakr al-Baghdadiand — somehow — a lot of porn.

With just over 24,000 members, the Facebook group represents the perfect case study of the toxic mix of extremist support on the platform, which continues to evade detection and attract attention. So why is it filled with pornography?

There has been much analysis of extremist groups and how their content evades detection, but not many have focused on the antics of those trying to fight these extremists online. Some of these vigilantes are lone actors, others are part of a “cyber adversary” affiliated with other extremist groups fighting rival online terrorist advocates.

The “Soldiers of the Righteous Caliphate” group is a microcosm of the wary digital detractors at play. It is the digital equivalent of a cage wrestling match between the cyber fighters of the supporters of the extremist group targeting the Islamic State, Hay’at Tahrir al-Sham and the Taliban.

The battlefields of these cyber adversaries and the conflict they foster in weaponized group posts and comments represent one of Facebook’s lesser-known moderation challenges.

Weapons of their choice: anime porn and numbered kama Sutra positions. Simply put, when terrorist advocates are violent on Facebook, their enemies tend to turn to porn.

For example, a 15-position Kama Sutra sexual behavior menu was recently shared with a post that reads, “The Caliphate’s army is on the road traced by Hind, daughter of Abu Sufyan out”. Some posters about group sex use a simpler message. Employing a police squad of nude female anime characters, each with increasingly larger busts, a detractor mocks “hell’s dogs,” a nickname well known in the United States. The Middle East is for supporters of the Islamic State.

Members of Anonymous, the shadow hacker collective, have posted pornography on the timelines of Islamic State supporters on Twitter.

Other lone actors were wary of targeting Taliban supporters in the group that made sexual references to the Taliban, posting dance videos of young Taliban fighters with emojis denoting the index finger as a sign OK as a means to suggest that the Taliban are homosexuals who “like black holes”. When the account Hay’at Tahrir al-Sham posted adorable photos of Abu Muhammad al-Joulani, the leader of the group, a non-radical account posted a photo allegedly of him having sex. to himself, which some believe is his narcissistic nature. .

However, the question is how are these posters networked? Does it indicate the presence of arch-enemies or are these just ordinary people with a penchant for killing terrorist supporters?

The answer is both.

All of these obvious containment efforts are often used by people who spot terrorist groups as well as by networks of opposing extremist groups on Facebook. The answer to why these tactics were used lies in a series of internal Facebook documents released in late October to 12 media organizations, which The Daily Beast reviewed. Prepared in December 2020, the issues noted by Facebook staff actually provide researchers with a better understanding of how the network of accounts fights extremism, as well as cyber adversaries, supports supports a wide range of extremist groups, operating on the platform to receive terrorist content when the platform does not.

In articles, the Middle East and North Africa Integrity Team at Facebook reported that “Iraq is a proxy for cyber adversaries working to report content to block certain pages or content.” The articles go on to mention that “reporters in Iraq understand the zero tolerance that FB has for CN .” [child nudity] and this is used by network adversaries to close certain pages. “

While none of the lone actors or extremist militant groups fighting each other in “Soldiers of the Righteous Caliphate” use child or child nudity to combat extremists, some used pornographic material to troll extremists and try to get their accounts banned.

Averaging 259 posts per day, “Soldiers of the Righteous Caliphate” is essentially the Golden Corral’s buffet for a platform-wide array of hand-to-hand combat holy groups and sometimes a loose network group. of those who do good. Using the group as a case study, it is clear that some of these accounts are simply friends with enough extreme content on the platform and have banded together, while others are members of Cyber ​​enemies affiliated with extremist groups intend to dominate the platform and dislodge their opponents. Many of them claim to be based in Iraq, Syria and other locations across the Middle East and North Africa.

By monitoring accounts and systematically reviewing their friends, followers, and likes, The Daily Beast is able to gauge who is associated with cyber-enemy and who is a built-in member. Loose build of vigilant Facebookers. What is clear is that many of the participants who posted the sexually charged material were members of the prominent Iran-backed Mobilization Forces political party pages in Iraq. Even more obvious is that the network of the Taliban, Hay’at Tahrir al-Sham, and Islamic State supporters on the ground is part of those cyber enemies.

Despite hating each other, supporters of the Taliban — through their large groups — and supporters of Hay’at Tahrir al-Sham, also affiliated with their groups, both hate the Islamic State, and have formed virtual armies to troll both. and ban the Islamic State from the platform.

Meanwhile, individuals seething with thoughts about extremists sharing content spaces on the world’s largest social network have gained attention by bombarding public spaces with obscene posts. .

There really is a history to these antics. Back in 2016, members of Anonymous, the shadow hacker collective, posted pornography on the timelines of Islamic State supporters on Twitter. In September 2020, intruders spammed pornographic content into Telegram channels managed by Islamic State supporters, who became frustrated with the inability to remove the content. .

Of course, this reads and looks like a rather childish farce to the casual observer and doesn’t necessarily work, but it does add an element of circus to the challenge of reducing support. terrorism on the platform.

Facebook removed the groups as reported by The Daily Beast. A spokesperson for Meta, Facebook’s parent company, said it does not “allow terrorists on our platform” and that it will remove “content that praises, represents or advocates them at any time.” We found it.”

Finally, scrolling through the Facebook group timeline shows more than just loss of content moderation at the regional level, but also has a loophole in moderating terrorist content that is explicitly banned by the platform’s community standards.

What is clear is that now, in the darkest corners of Facebook, one man’s porn is another’s anti-terrorism drug — and this eerie phenomenon seems to have no end.

https://www.thedailybeast.com/terror-supporters-are-using-anime-porn-to-fight-virtual-battles-on-facebook?source=articles&via=rss Terrorists Are Using Porn Anime Against Facebook’s Virtual Battles

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