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Rugby union governing bodies launch action plan to deal with reduction of head impacts and concussions | Rugby Union News

Last updated: 21.07.07 21 19:22 pm

Head injuries and concussions in the rugby union are at the heart of the new action plan

Head injuries and concussions in the rugby union are at the heart of the new action plan

The Rugby Union, Rugby Premiership and Rugby Players Association have launched an action plan aimed at reducing head impact and risk of concussion in both elite rugby union games and training.

The work plan identifies how science and technology can be used to develop thinking to improve player well-being and brain health for future, present and past players.

Much attention has been paid to side effects side by side to work on raising the standard of head impact and concussion within the professional game and introducing a new brain health assessment service for retired elite players and men.

In the area of ​​primary prevention, the use of “conservative mouths” will take place in the 2021/22 and 2022/23 seasons, with RFU requesting all 13 Premiership clubs to use them to create new contact training areas – the Harlequins men’s team and Bristol Bear Women have already tested the technology , which allows employees to monitor head effects in real time.

Secondary prevention includes the implementation of global alumni return protocols and independent consultant muscle reviews, as well as the use of real-life Hawkeye videos to facilitate the assessment of women’s head injuries in Premier 15, as well as the resumption of oral saliva collection. men’s game (and start it in women)

And once the careers are over, there will be a third prevention player for players, the Advanced BRAIN Health Clinic, which will open in London later in 2021, allowing the evaluation and management of all former players between the ages of 30 and 55, who have concerns about their brain health.

British and Irish Lions captain Alun Vin Jones says the team is in South Africa to win a series of tests and insists his recovery from shoulder straps is not just up to him.

Sky Sports 0:31
British and Irish Lions captain Alun Vin Jones says the team is in South Africa to win a series of tests and insists his recovery from shoulder straps is not just up to him.

British and Irish Lions captain Alun Vin Jones says the team is in South Africa to win a series of tests and insists his recovery from shoulder straps is not just up to him.

RFU Medical Services Director Dr. Simon Kemp said Sky Sports News: “Based on our experience with the Harlequins and the mouths of the defenders, the interest of the players and the coaching staff to understand the intensity of their training was very high for them.

“They were very accustomed to understanding running load, GPS data and speed and deceleration load. What the guards’ mouths give them is an idea of ​​the impact and acceleration of the head.”

“Both clubs have reported very positive use of this in the club setting, excluding the cost of the study.”

Damian Hopley admits that players may be concerned about the outcome of a study that shows a fifth-degree brain cell deficiency is a concern, but he supports the sport to make the necessary changes.

Damian Hopley admits that players may be concerned about the outcome of a study that shows a fifth-degree brain cell deficiency is a concern, but he supports the sport to make the necessary changes.

RAPA director Damien Hopley is confident the sport will remain at the immediate end of concussion and safety investigations, but acknowledged that it is likely that some of his constituents turned to the results of a study from Imperial College that showed one-fifth of elite players showed signs of intoxication. white of the brain.

A study by Drake Rugby Biomarker, which recruited RFU, examined 44 elite players in July 2017 and September 2019, and the results of the second scans revealed that about half of those taken after the first year had 23 percent of the cells. their brains have shown abnormalities.

Hopley said: “Obviously it’s going to work the hares. Obviously it’s going to be a headline that will scare some players, but we have to make sure we get it in the moment it’s happening right now. that we are seeing all the existing research and studies with informed responses behind it.

Hopley also believes that current players are in favor of reducing contact work in training.

He added: “Based on the conversations we’ve had, I think the player will welcome it. It’s about how we manage it, how we do it properly, with medical information. , which we talked about.

“Trying to make sure that communication, lighting and regulation around it is an important step forward.”

https://www.skysports.com/rugby-union/news/12040/12360839/rugby-union-governing-bodies-launch-action-plan-to-deal-with-reduction-of-head-impacts-and-concussions | Rugby union governing bodies launch action plan to deal with reduction of head impacts and concussions | Rugby Union News

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