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Rope Bondage is so much more than sex

As she deftly strapped her partner to a steel hanging tripod, Marceline VQ let inspiration guide her. Using natural hemp rope to recreate a scene from Michelangelo’s famous fresco, Adam’s Creation, Marceline considers every reaction her partner makes, as the woman is suspended in mid-air.

Her partner’s arm stretched out to touch something powerful but invisible. Smiling, eyes closed, she looked completely absorbed.

“What I really love is just the feeling of a rope going through my hand,” says Marceline, gesturing to mimic the moving rope. “You go into a state of flow.”

Currently, Marceline, 26 years old, is an engineering researcher and PhD in physics. By night, she is an artist and educator who ties ropes. Her pseudonym, “Marceline VQ,” was adapted from the character “Marceline the Vampire Queen” from the animated series. Adventure Time, because she wanted to keep her academic life separate from her rope-tipping gigs. She tries constantly to challenge world of BDSM—Bondage, domination, subjugation, and masochism — with aesthetic concepts and intricate rope techniques.

“When I was first starting out, the struggle for me was trying to show people who weren’t involved in this that rope binding doesn’t have to always revolve around sex,” she says. Although for her, it is and it is not.

Before the pandemic hit, she was invited to perform and teach a class called “rope physics” around the country. Combining her artistic and scientific skills, she uses geometry to inspire most of her rope tying work.

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“When creating a piece of rope binding, I would take the idea of ​​turning a four-dimensional object into three dimensions,” she says. “I am about to turn off the analytical side of the brain and feel more than think, in many ways. That’s unusual for people doing intense mental work.”

However, Marceline’s rope-binding experiences were not always artistic. Smiling shyly, she admits the “epiphany” moment came when she was playing a game of “cops and robbers” with her friend when she was 10 years old. Tying her friend’s hand behind her back with a rope, Marceline had the thrill of stepping back to appreciate her “work of art” and thinking she wanted to be a part of it.

“I think people understand their sexuality much earlier than they realize,” she said.

Marceline began her rope-binding journey in 2014 when she learned about several BDSM subcultures on FetLife, the social network for the BDSM and kink communities. There, she discovered “sexual fanatics” who went beyond what was considered conventional sexual practice. They do not “practice” binding with ropes. They “play” it.

Tied with ropes, or “shibari,” Derived from the Japanese martial art of restraining the captives and later converted into erotic binding in the late 19th century, according to the first instruction in English book on Shibari. “Shibari is a Japanese form of sex play that uses rope restraint. It may or may not be sexual, but it definitely revolves around fun and enjoyment and play,” Midori—An online pseudonym of the famous sexologist and author of The Seduction Art of Japanese Slaves.

“While most of the work I produce on the string doesn’t tend to be sexually suggestive, I don’t want to distance myself entirely from those origins, because that’s why we’re here today. .”

The view of rope binding has become inconsistent over time. After studying abroad in Japan for a few months in 2017, Marceline said she noticed a slight change in the shibari community. Some members started to consider rope binding as art, which has since been abolished completely.”messy, dirty” History.

“Although most of the work I produce on the string doesn’t tend to be very sexually suggestive, I don’t want to distance myself completely from those origins, because that’s why we’re here today. now,” Marceline said.

Midori also believes that it is essential to understand the origin of the leash. “I’m practicing this like an art,” said the sexologist angrily. “It’s about enhancing one’s own social prestige.”

After the release of the erotic book Fifty shades of gray, kink subcultures gained mainstream momentum in 2011. Kink behavior is common among US adults, according to a 2017 study from Indiana’s University Center for Promoting Sexual Health. More than 30% of those surveyed admitted they participated in spanking, more than 22% engaged in role play and more than 20% engaged in rope binding.

Fifty shades of gray Susan Wright, spokesperson for the National Coalition for Sexual Freedom (NCSF), a nonprofit that advocates for sexual freedom for all adults, has changed the way people perceive and Open the consent conversation.

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Although some movies and books have pushed BDSM into the realm of popular culture, binding with ropes is still taboo for many people. Some feminists expressed strong opposition. Caitlin Roper, a feminist activist and PhD, says: “I do not believe that meaningful sexual emancipation is achieved through recreating the same domination-subordination dynamic of dominance. of men is institutionalized. female sex doll research candidate. “Given my understanding of feminism as a collective movement to liberate all women from patriarchal oppression, I do not believe there is a feminist case for male violence and female degradation. women, even if some women agree or say they like it. ”

Over the past few years, the National Coalition for Sexual Freedom has seen an increasing number of dominant and homosexual women in distinct cultures. Marceline has mixed views on the use of gender in the interpretation of BDSM. “Feminism is about giving women the right to decide what is best for themselves. I’m one of those women who find sexual emancipation in other lowly cultures, but there’s definitely an opportunity for the really bad guys to get in on this scene and use it for their own ends. them,” she explained.

Harnessing the versatility of bondage in a modern context, Marceline now believes that kink sub-creatures can all be sexual and viscera. She loves the interplay between the physical pose and its emotional components.

“You can think of the rope like an intimate massage, or you can think of the rope as an exercise or therapy,” she says. “It’s like dancing.”

https://www.thedailybeast.com/rope-bondage-is-about-far-more-than-sex?source=articles&via=rss Rope Bondage is so much more than sex

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